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News, Views, and Clues

October, 2002

small lineThe Morning News: Adult Education State Directors' National Training Institute San Francisco, November 6-9, 2002, October 3, 2002

small line Reauthorization “Bottom Lines” , October 7, 2002


small line    New Airline Ticket Policy, October 16, 2002

small line  Your Five Minutes of Glory, October 29, 2002

 small line Garrett’s Analysis of HR 3801 (formerly OERI), October, 29, 2002

NAEPDC
News, Views, and Clues

October 3, 2002

The Morning News
Adult Education State Directors' National Training Institute
San Francisco, November 6-9, 2002

You are doing some really exciting things in your state that you need to share with your colleagues.  Your venue is the Morning News, Co-hosted by the lovely and talented Israel Mendoza (WA) and Diane Glass (KS).

Remember all the useful tidbits of information you learned over the last few years during the Morning Show, not to mention the laughs? Now it's your turn to share some knowledge with the rest of us! Do you have a really interesting initiative going on in your state that you want to share? Have you developed a new process or policy that has had significant impact? Whatever it is, we would like to have you as a guest on the Morning Show!  

During breakfast on Thursday and Friday, our Co-hosts offer you five minutes of fame to brag about your current initiatives or events.   Here are the steps: 

  1. Notify Linda Warner, Indiana State Director at (317-232-0521) or lwarner@doe.state.in.us.
  2. Indicate your preference for Thursday or Friday morning (if you have one).  Linda will confirm your exact time before the Institute.
  3. Provide copy for an overhead transparency that bullets your points.
  4. Provide more detailed copy for The State Directors Morning News, which is a newspaper format of the morning presentations. This maximum half-page typed information can give more details of the activities.
  5. Provide the name of the State Director or other who will make the presentation.
  6. BE SURE TO LIMIT YOUR PRESENTATION TO FIVE MINUTES.

 It is not Good Morning America, but it is not bad. 

Keep up the good work.  Let me know when we can help.

NAEPDC
News, Views, and Clues

October 7, 2002

Reauthorization “Bottom Lines” 

Reauthorization of our adult education legislation is fast approaching.  In preparation, the Council Policy Committee and Executive Committee have been deliberating what should be emphasized in the upcoming discussions. 

In 1995, the Adult Education State Directors developed the “Bottom Lines” which described the mutually decided points that should be in any federal adult education legislation.  This spring and summer, those “Bottom Lines” have been revisited in light of the first four years of WIA.  The resulting new “Bottom Lines” are attached.  The purpose for creating this document is to stimulate discussion about what is important and to allow adult educators to speak with one voice on important issues to better serve adult learners.

Look over the attached “Bottom Lines.”  (You may obtain a copy by contacting lmclendon@naepdc.org).  

1.      Review them with your staff and local practitioners

2.      If you plan to testify at one of the upcoming hearings, feel free draw from this information in preparation for your testimony.

3.      Be prepared to share you thoughts with your colleagues at the National Training Institute in San Francisco where the Council Policy members will facilitate a “Bottom Lines” discussion.    

Any concerns or comments prior to the San Francisco meeting can be sent to Roberta Pawloski (CT), Policy Chair (roberta.pawloski@po.state.ct.us). 

 Keep up the good work.  Let me know when we can help.

 

NAEPDC
News, Views, and Clues

October 16, 2002

 New Airline Ticket Policy 

It has been troublesome in the past when National Training Institute participants wait until the last minute to make travel arrangements.  It only takes a few of those expensive tickets to drive up our cost—which is supported by your dues.  The Consortium’s budget is really tight, and we are looking for every way to reduce costs.

Therefore, the Executive Committee recently adopted the following policy:

NTI Participants for whom the Consortium pays travel costs are asked to make a 14-day advance purchase of airline tickets through our travel agency, Corporate Travel.  The cut off date this year is October 23rd.  If you do not make travel arrangements prior to the cutoff date, you will not be able to use our travel agency.  You must use your own travel agent and the Consortium will reimburse your airline fare to an amount not to exceed the cost of a 14-day advance ticket.

If you find yourself past the 14-day advance date, some of your colleagues find inexpensive fares on www.hotwire.com and www.priceline.com or other similar discounters.  I use them often and even though you have no control of flying times, the connections are good, and the rates are worth it.

Thank you for your understanding and for you efforts to adhere to this money saving policy.  The Executive Committee and I are trying to be good stewards of your funds.

Should you have questions, feel free to call me.

NAEPDC
News, Views, and Clues

October 29, 2002

Your Five Minutes of Glory 

We still have some spots left on the Morning News on Thursday and Friday morning in San Francisco.  This is your chance for five minutes of fame and glory and to share successes you have had with your colleagues. 

Details below:

During breakfast on Thursday and Friday, our Co-hosts, Israel Mendoza (WA) and Diane Glass (KS) offer you five minutes of fame to brag about your current initiatives or events.   Here are the steps:

  1. Notify Linda Warner, Indiana State Director at (317-232-0521) or lwarner@doe.state.in.us.
  2. Indicate your preference for Thursday or Friday morning (if you have one).  Linda will confirm your exact time before the Institute.
  3. Provide copy for an overhead transparency that bullets your points.
  4. Provide more detailed copy for The State Directors Morning News, which is a newspaper format of the morning presentations. This maximum half-page typed information can give more details of the activities.
  5. Provide the name of the State Director or other who will make the presentation.
  6. BE SURE TO LIMIT YOUR PRESENTATION TO FIVE MINUTES.

Keep up the good work.  Let me know when we can help.

 

NAEPDC
News, Views, and Clues

October 29, 2002

Garrett’s Analysis of HR 3801 (formerly OERI)

To:  State Directors of Adult Education 

From:  Garrett Murphy

Subject:  Authorization of a New “Institute of Educational Sciences” to Replace the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) 

References to adult education in this summary are in bold typeface.

Title I of this legislation, which has been agreed to by both Houses of Congress establishes the new Institute within the Department of Education.  It is to be headed by a Director, appointed by the President – with the advice and consent of the Senate – who shall serve for a term of 6 years. But the first Director may be appointed by the President without the advice and consent of the Senate and may be the incumbent Assistant Secretary for OERI. 

The Act makes it clear that the authorizing language for the National Assessment of Educational Progress will continue as before this legislation.

The legislation assigns the Director a long list of duties and priorities in which adult education is not mentioned, although an Adult Literacy Center is established later in the Act.  The Institute is to have a board of directors.   Along with advising on priorities, procedures, policies and activities, one of the Board’s responsibilities is to advise the Director to ensure that “activities conducted or supported by the Institute are objective, secular, neutral, and nonideological and are free of partisan political influence of racial, cultural, gender or regional bias.”

In addition to ex officio members of the Board, (the Director, three Commissioners to be described below, the Director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Director of the Census, the Commissioner of Labor Statistics and the Director of the National Science Foundation) there are to be 15 appointed members of which no fewer than 8 must be researchers in the field of statistics, evaluation, social sciences, or physical or biological sciences.  Board members will be appointed initially to 2, 3, and 4 year terms in order to establish a continuing body.  The Board will elect a chair.

The legislation also establishes three Centers – one each for research, statistics, and evaluation/regional assistance.  Each Center will have a commissioner appointed by the Director with the advice of the Board. (One exception is the Commissioner for the Center on Education Statistics, who must be appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate.)  The Board may establish standing committees to serve each of the three Centers.  These Committees may have among their members highly qualified people who are not members of the Board.

Activities carried out under the Act will be done through grants, contracts or cooperative arrangements, at a minimum, and shall be awarded on a competitive basis and, when practicable, through a process of peer review.

The Center for Education Research is to carry out scientifically valid research that includes both basic and applied research.  The definitions section contains a definition of “scientifically based research standards” that includes an admonition to make ”claims of causal relationships only in random assignment experiments or other designs (to the extent such other designs substantially eliminate plausible competing explanations for the obtained results).”

One mechanism by which the Research Center is to carry out its obligations is through a group of 11 statutorily authorized National Research and Development Centers. The very first such Center listed is the one for Adult Literacy.  Such Centers are to address areas of national need, including technology.  Support for the Centers shall be for a period of 5 years and may, if supported by the Director, the Research Center Commissioner and the Board, be renewed without competition for another 5 years.  After 10 years there must be a competitive process to select the agency to operate the Center. (The existing adult education Center is the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) at Harvard University.  It is currently in its 7th year.)  At least 50% of funds provided to a National Research and Development Center is to be applied to long-term research programs of not less than 5 years.

The language establishing the Center for Education Statistics contains a number of references to adult education.  Statistics are to be collected from “preschool, elementary, secondary, postsecondary and adult levels in the United States….”  Included must be data on “secondary school dropouts, and adult literacy and reading skills.”   The Statistics Commissioner may accomplish the mission of the Center via grants, contracts and cooperative agreements. The Commissioner may use information collected “from States, local education agencies, public and private schools, preschools, institutions of higher education, vocational and adult education programs, libraries, administrators , teachers, students, the general public and other individuals, organizations, agencies, and institutions (including information collected by States and local education agencies for their own use);….”  “The Statistics Center may establish 1 or more national cooperative education statistics systems for the purpose of producing ad maintaining, with the cooperation of the States, comparable and uniform information and data on early childhood education, elementary and secondary education, postsecondary education, adult education, and libraries….”

The third Center established in the law is the Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance.  Among its duties are to conduct evaluations of federal programs administered by the Secretary and (as time permits) other education programs, to provide technical assistance, to support wide dissemination of results of research and evaluation efforts, and to encourage the use of scientifically valid research and education.

The Commissioner is charged with disseminating results on: reading, mathematics and, science; closing the achievement gap; educational practices that improve academic achievement; and “those topics covered by the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) clearinghouses (established under section 941(f) of the Educational Research, Development, Dissemination and Improvement Act of 1994 (10USC6041(f) (as such provision was in effect on the day before the enactment of this Act).”

Under “Additional Duties”  the Commissioner must “continue awards for the support of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) Clearinghouses and contracts for regional education laboratories (established under subsections (f) and (h) of section 941 of the Educational Research, Development, Dissemination, and Improvement Act of 1994 (20 U.S.C. 6041(f) and (h) (as such awards were in effect on the day before the enactment of the Act) for the duration of those awards, in accordance with the terms and agreements of such awards.”

The Act also establishes a National Library of Education whose responsibility it is to collect and archive information and provide comprehensive reference services on matters relating to education to Department employees, grantees and contractors, other Federal employees and members of the public.  Information collected and archived by the Library shall include products and publications produced by the Institute and other relevant research, statistics, and evaluation materials that are consistent with scientifically valid research or the priorities and mission of the Institute and developed by the Department of Education or other Federal agencies including the ERIC clearinghouses.

The Act provides for 10 Regional Educational Laboratories for Research, Development, Dissemination and Technical Assistance.  The regions served by these entities shall be the same 10 regions served by the existing laboratories.  There is no mention of adult education in the sections dealing with these laboratories.

$400,000,000 is authorized for the Institute and $100,000,000 for the Regional Educational Laboratories for fiscal year 2003 with “such sums as may be necessary” for each of the five succeeding fiscal years. Of amount provided to the Institute, the Center for Education Statistics may not receive less than it currently receives.

Title II of the Act is entitled the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002.  The title authorizes awards of not less than 20 grants to local entities to provide technical assistance and professional development to low performing schools.  Each of the 10 regions that has a Regional Laboratory must have a Comprehensive Center.  A competition shall be held to select the awardees.  Eligible applicants are (1) research institutions, agencies, or organizations, (2) institutions of higher education, (3) partnerships among such entities, and (4) individuals with demonstrated capacity to carry out the functions of the Center – including entities that carried our activities under the Educational Research, Development, Dissemination, and Improvement Act of 1994.  Each Center shall have an advisory board.

The Act also provides for a Regional Advisory Committee for each of the 10 regions. These Committees are to provide regional assessments, i.e. each regional advisory committee must assess the educational needs within the region to be served.  Input for such assessments must be solicited from a number of sources, among which are “other customers (such as adult education programs)….” This is the only other mention of adult education in the Act.

There are authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 2003 $80,000,000 and such sums as may be necessary for the 5 succeeding fiscal years.

Title III of the Act is the National Assessment of Educational Progress Authorization Act. It authorizes $4,600,000 for the Board and $107,500,000 for operations for fiscal year 2003 and such sums as may be necessary for the succeeding five fiscal years.

 

 

Although this analysis is somewhat lengthy I have just scratched the surface of this very comprehensive piece of legislation.  Those interested in seeing the complete text may do so by opening www.thomas.loc.gov  Enter HR3801 in the appropriate box.  You will be offered 5 versions of the bill.  Click on version #1.  If you get a “this page cannot be displayed” message, search for Thomas on your browser and click on the entry that is entitled “Thomas Legislative Information.”  If that doesn’t work, open www.house.gov   Click on “The Legislative Process”.  Then click on “107th Congress Bill Text” and enter HR3801 in the appropriate box.

Keep up the good work.  Let me know when we can help.

 

NAEPDC

A Natural Resource For Adult Education State Directors and their Staff Members

Dr. Lennox L. McLendon, Executive Director

lmclendon@naepdc.org
www.naepdc.org

202.624.5250
202.624.1497 FAX

 

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